Monthly Archives: October 2017

Municipal debt invalid, the Constitutional Court has ruled

On 23 May 2017, the Constitutional Court heard an application for confirmation of an order of the High Court of South Africa, that declared section 118(3) of the Local Government: Municipal Systems Act, 2000, constitutionally invalid.

On 29 August, in a ruling majority written by Justice Edwin Cameron, the court found that upon transfer of a property, a new owner is not liable for old municipal debt.

Section 118 of the Municipal Systems Act

Section 118(3) explains that municipal debt on any property is a charge upon that property and enjoys preference over any mortgage bond registered against the property. However, the question was whether this means that, when a new owner buys the property, the property remains with the debts of a previous owner.

What did the court say?

The court ruled that section 118 (3) is “well capable of being interpreted”, so that the historical debt is not transferred to a new owner of the property.

“What is notable about section 118(3) is that the legislature did not require that the charge (historical debt) be either registered or noted on the register of deeds. Textually, there is no indication that the right given to municipalities has a third-party effect (to a new owner)… It (historical debt) stands alone, isolated and unsupported, without foundation or undergirding and with no express words carrying any suggestion that it is transmissible,” the court said in the judgement.

References:

  • The Constitutional Court of South Africa
  • “Concourt rules new homeowners not liable for debts of previous owners”, Ray Mahlaka, The Citizen, 29 August 2017. https://citizen.co.za/news/south-africa/1631149/concourt-rules-new-homeowners-not-liable-for-debts-of-previous-owners/
  • Jordaan and Another v City of Tshwane Metropolitan Municipality and Others; New Ventures Consulting & Services (Pty) Ltd and Others v City of Tshwane Metropolitan Municipality and Another; Livanos and Others v Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality and Another; Oak Plant Rentals (Pty) Ltd and Others v Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality (74195/2013; 13039/2014; 13040/2014; 19552/2015; 23826/2014) [2016] ZAGPPHC 941; [2017] 1 All SA 585 (GP); 2017 (2) SA 295 (GP) (7 November 2016)

This article is a general information sheet and should not be used or relied on as legal or other professional advice. No liability can be accepted for any errors or omissions nor for any loss or damage arising from reliance upon any information herein. Always contact your legal adviser for specific and detailed advice. Errors and omissions excepted (E&OE)

New requirements to re-instate a company or close corporation

A company or close corporation may be deregistered upon request from the company or close corporation or any other third party. A company or close corporation may also be re-instated. However, since the withdrawal of Practice Note 6 of 2008, and its replacement with Notice 08 of 2017, there are new requirements for the re-instatement.

The Practice Note is issued in terms of Regulation 4(2)(b) of the Companies Regulations, 2011, and is applicable to the re-instatement of companies and close corporations in terms of Companies Regulation 40(6) and (7).

What are the new requirements?

Since December 2016, to re-instate a company or close corporation, the re-instatement application on a form CoR40.5 must comply with the following requirements regardless of the cause or date of deregistration:

  • Certified identity copy of the applicant;
  • Certified identity copy of the owner of the customer code;
  • Multiple deed search (deed search of each of the 10 regional deeds offices);
  • Letter from the Department of Public Works, only if the multiple deed search reflects immovable property;
  • Sufficient documentary proof indicating that the company or close corporation was in business or that it had any outstanding assets or liabilities, at the time of deregistration;
  • Mandate from the applicant confirming that the customer may submit on his/her behalf.

When can a company or close corporation be re-instated?

CIPC will only consider re-instating a company or close corporation if it can provide proof that it was conducting business at the time of deregistration, or has any other economic value. Furthermore, upon the successful processing of the re-instatement application, all outstanding annual returns must be filed in order to complete the process, within 30 business days from date of the re-instatement.

Reference:

  • Companies and Intellectual Property Commission | CIPC. Practice Note 08 of 2017, Requirements for re-instatement in terms of Regulations 4(2)(b).

This article is a general information sheet and should not be used or relied on as legal or other professional advice. No liability can be accepted for any errors or omissions nor for any loss or damage arising from reliance upon any information herein. Always contact your legal adviser for specific and detailed advice. Errors and omissions excepted (E&OE)

SARS to intensify action against tax offenders

Despite the fact that SARS has upheld their philosophy of education, service, and thereafter enforcement, they have noticed an increase in taxpayers not submitting their tax returns by the stipulated deadlines, and not settling their outstanding debt with SARS. This is not limited to the current tax year but includes substantial non-compliance across previous tax years.

It is for this reason that from October 2017 SARS will intensify criminal proceedings against tax offenders. Failure to submit the return(s) within the said period could result in:

  • Administrative penalties being imposed on a monthly basis per outstanding return.
  • Criminal prosecution resulting in imprisonment or a fine for each day that such default continues.

Types of tax

SARS has reminded all taxpayers that, according to the Tax Administration Act No. 28 of 2011, it is a criminal offence not to submit a tax return for any of the tax types they are registered. These tax types are:

  • Personal Income Tax (PIT)
  • Corporate Income Tax (CIT)
  • Pay as You Earn (PAYE)
  • Value Added Tax (VAT)

It is also important to note that should any return result in a tax debt it must be paid before the relevant due date to avoid any interest for late payment and legal action. To avoid any penalties, interest, prosecutions as well as imprisonment, taxpayers are urged to rectify their compliance by submitting any outstanding returns as soon as possible. Please contact your tax advisor for assistance.

This article is a general information sheet and should not be used or relied on as legal or other professional advice. No liability can be accepted for any errors or omissions nor for any loss or damage arising from reliance upon any information herein. Always contact your legal adviser for specific and detailed advice. Errors and omissions excepted (E&OE)

The 10 steps when taking a dispute to the CCMA

If you have a dispute with your employer, you may want to ask the Commission for Conciliation, Mediation and Arbitration (“CCMA”) to conciliate or even arbitrate your dispute. A union or employer’s organisation may also initiate this action. Furthermore, you do not need the other party’s consent before taking a matter to the CCMA.

Steps for disputes at the CCMA

According to the CCMA, the steps involved in resolving a dispute include:

Step 1: In the case of an unfair dismissal dispute, you have only 30 days from the date on which the dispute arose to open a case, if the case is an unfair labour practice, you have only 90 days and, with discrimination cases, you have six months.

Step 2: If you have decided to lodge a dispute, you need to complete a CCMA case referral form (also known as LRA Form 7.11.).

Step 3: Once you have completed the form, you need to ensure that a copy is delivered to the other party and you must be able to prove that a copy was sent.

Step 4: You do not have to bring the referral form to the CCMA in person. You may also fax the form or post it. Make sure that a copy of the proof that the form had been served on the other party is also enclosed.

Step 5: The CCMA will inform both parties as to the date, time and venue of the first hearing.

Step 6: Usually the first meeting is called conciliation. Only the parties, trade union or employers’ organisation representatives (if a party to the dispute is a member) and the CCMA commissioner will attend.

Step 7: If no agreement is reached, the commissioner will issue a certificate to that effect. Depending on the nature of the dispute, the case may be referred to the CCMA for arbitration or the Labour Court as the next step.

Step 8: In order to have an arbitration hearing, you have to complete a request for arbitration form, (also known as LRA Form 7.13.). A copy must be served on the other party (same as in step 3).

Step 9: Arbitration is a more formal process and evidence, including witnesses and documents, may be necessary to prove your case. Parties may cross-examine each other and legal representation is allowed. The commissioner will make a final and binding decision, called an arbitration award, within 14 days.

Step 10: If a party does not comply with the arbitration award, it may be made an order of the Labour Court.

Reference:

  • The Commission for Conciliation, Mediation and Arbitration | CCMA | http://www.ccma.org.za/Advice/Referring-a-Dispute

This article is a general information sheet and should not be used or relied on as legal or other professional advice. No liability can be accepted for any errors or omissions nor for any loss or damage arising from reliance upon any information herein. Always contact your legal adviser for specific and detailed advice. Errors and omissions excepted (E&OE)