Category Archives: Business

Is your Business POPI Compliant?

POPI refers to South Africa’s Protection of Personal Information Act which seeks to regulate the Processing of Personal Information.

What is Personal Information?

Means any information relating to an identifiable, living natural person or juristic person (companies, CC’s etc.) and includes, but is not limited to:

  • Contact details: email, telephone, address etc.
  • Demographic information: age, sex, race, birth date, ethnicity etc.
  • History: employment, financial, educational, criminal, medical history
  • Biometric information: blood type etc.
  • Opinions of and about the person
  • Private correspondence etc.

What is Processing?

Processing broadly means anything done with someone’s personal Information, including collection, usage, storage, dissemination, modification or destruction (whether such processing is automated or not).

Some of the obligations under POPI:

  • Only collect information that you need for a specific purpose.
  • Apply reasonable security measures to protect it.
  • Ensure it is relevant and up to date.
  • Only hold as much as you need, and only for as long as you need it.
  • Allow the subject of the information to see it upon request.

Does POPI really apply to me or my business?

POPI applies to every South African based public and/or private body who, either alone, or in conjunction with others, determines the purpose of or means for processing personal information in South Africa.

There are cases where POPI does not apply. Exclusions include: Section 6:

  • purely household or personal activity.
  • sufficiently de-identified information.
  • some state functions including criminal prosecutions, national security etc.
  • journalism under a code of ethics.
  • judiciary functions etc.

Why should I comply with POPI?

POPI promotes transparency with regard to what information is collected and how it is to be processed. Openness increases customer trust in the organisation.

Non-compliance with the Act could expose the Responsible Party to a penalty of a fine and/or imprisonment of up to 12 months. In certain cases, the penalty for non-compliance could be a fine and/or imprisonment of up 10 years.

This article is a general information sheet and should not be used or relied on as legal or other professional advice. No liability can be accepted for any errors or omissions nor for any loss or damage arising from reliance upon any information herein. Always contact your legal adviser for specific and detailed advice. Errors and omissions excepted (E&OE)

How to register a new company

a1bThe basic steps to register a company under the Companies Act of 2008 at the Companies and Intellectual Property Commission (CIPC) involves certain forms and supporting documentation that must be lodged and the accompanied fees paid.

The steps

The first step in registering a new company is optional. A CoR9.1 form must be completed and lodged with the CIPC in order to reserve a name for the company to be registered. However, the Act does make provision for a company to be registered without a name. The company registration number will then be the name of the company until such time as the company properly registers a name. A certified copy of the identity document of the applicant must be submitted as supporting documentation with this form and a filing fee is payable.

The next step is to complete and lodge the CoR14.1 Notice of Incorporation form together with the CoR15.1 Memorandum of Incorporation.

The Notice of Incorporation specifically contains information regarding the type of company to be registered, the incorporation date, financial year end, registered address, number of directors and the company name if applicable. A certified copy of the identity document of the applicant must be submitted as supporting documentation and a filing fee is payable. A CoR14.1A form contains specific information about the directors of the company who will be appointed at registration, and this form must be lodged together with the Cor14.1. Certified copies of the identity documents of all directors to be appointed must be submitted as supporting documentation. An optional form CoR14.1D may be lodged together with the CoR14.1, which indicates any company appointments to be registered with the CIPC, such as a company secretary or auditor.

The Memorandum of Incorporation is probably the most important document when registering a company, since the provisions contained herein will govern the company. It can be short and simple, or long and extremely technical, depending on what type of company is being registered. In this regard, it is best to seek professional advice. The supporting documentation and filing fees applicable will depend on what type of Memorandum of Incorporation is being registered.

If an auditor or company secretary is appointed at registration as contained in the CoR14.1D, a CoR44 form must also be completed and submitted. No filing fee is payable for this form. An original acceptance letter and certified copy of the identity document of the auditor or company secretary must be submitted as supporting documentation.

The CoR21.1 Notice of Registered Address must be completed with the particulars of the registered address of the company. Again a certified copy of the identity document of the applicant must be submitted as supporting documentation, but no filing fee is payable.

Once all the necessary forms and supporting documentation has been submitted and applicable fees paid, the CIPC will issue a Registration Certificate form CoR14.3 if it is satisfied that all provisions in the Act has been satisfied.

Any changes to the information placed on record at the CIPC at the original registration of the company, must be registered without delay and on the proper forms and possible payment of applicable filing fees.

This article is a general information sheet and should not be used or relied on as legal or other professional advice. No liability can be accepted for any errors or omissions nor for any loss or damage arising from reliance upon any information herein. Always contact your legal adviser for specific and detailed advice. Errors and omissions excepted (E&OE)

I bought something that doesn’t work

Sarah buys furniture from Mark who promised her that the furniture is of good quality. However, he doesn’t notify her about problems with the furniture. Later, Sarah discovers that some of the chairs she bought have faulty joints, meaning they can’t be used properly. This is what’s called a latent defect and Sarah will be able to claim from Mark for the furniture not fulfilling its purpose.

                                                                                                                          A patent defect or a latent defect?

A patent defect is when there’s a problem with a purchased item but it was clearly visible and obvious to the buyer when the contract was signed. If the furniture that Sarah bought had a patent defect, such as a chair leg missing, it would be assumed that she knew about it and the law would not protect her.

NOTE: A defect is something that makes the product less useful or completely useless. A product not looking as good as you thought is not a defect. A piece of furniture with a stain on it can still be used normally. If the product has broken or missing parts, meaning it can’t be used properly, it’s a defect.

If the product you bought has a defect affecting its usability and purpose, then the seller is liable and you as the buyer can claim from them. You should also take into account if the contract had a “voetstoots” clause, meaning that you are buying a product based on its appearance or “as is”. If this is the case the seller would not be held accountable for any defects with the product, latent or patent.

What can I get back from the seller?

If the product you bought has a latent defect you can get a price reduction or a refund for the price you paid. A price reduction is the difference between the price you paid and the true value of the product. A full refund includes the price you paid, interest, maintenance costs and the cost of receiving the product. A full refund would also mean that you need to return the product that you got under the contract.

If a defect has caused you harm or damaged your property, for instance, you could possibly also claim this amount as compensation from the seller.

Who is a trader and who is a seller?

It’s important to keep in mind that there’s a difference between someone who is a trader and a seller. A trader is someone who makes a living from selling products, whereas a seller is an ordinary person like Mark in the example above. A trader who specialises in particular products and boasts having a specialized knowledge is held to a higher standard than an ordinary seller.

Sales talk or latent defect

It’s normal for sellers or traders to do the best to sell their product. This usually means “sales talk” or boasting about the products value and usefulness. They are allowed to do this, however, if they make statements about the product that turn out to be false, such as claiming the product can do something that it actually can’t, the law will be in your favour and protect you in the same way as a latent defect.

Before you agree to buy anything from a seller or a trader make sure you inspect the product first and make note of any defects there might be. If you neglect to inspect the product it could be more difficult for you to get compensation from the seller if there is a problem in the future.

Reference:

  • “What you should know about Contracts”. 2009. The Western Cape Office of the Consumer Protector. Department of Economic Development and Tourism. Accessed from: https://www.westerncape.gov.za/ on 13/05/2016.

This article is a general information sheet and should not be used or relied on as legal or other professional advice. No liability can be accepted for any errors or omissions nor for any loss or damage arising from reliance upon any information herein. Always contact your legal adviser for specific and detailed advice. Errors and omissions excepted (E&OE)

What’s the buzz about business rescue?

If a company/close corporation is in financial trouble and all possible avenues to save the business have been exhausted, there is one last option available to save the business: it can lodge an application for business rescue at the CIPC. In order to qualify for business rescue proceedings, the business must satisfy the requirements as set out in the next paragraph.

                                                                                                                            A company/close corporation will only be considered as a business rescue candidate if all three of the following requirements are met:

1. The decision to start business rescue proceedings must be taken before any liquidation proceedings have been instituted against the business.
2. The business is financially distressed.
3. A business is seen as financially distressed if:

  • It seems reasonably unlikely that the business can pay its debts in the normal course of   business for the next six months, or
  • It seems reasonably likely that the business will be insolvent in the next six months.
  • There seems to be a reasonable chance of rescuing the business.

What is the aim of a business rescue plan?

The aim of placing a company/close corporation under business rescue is to give the business some breathing space to implement the business rescue plan and give the business a fair chance to become a going concern again.

Alternatively, if the business is liquidated despite the business rescue proceedings, the aim is to hopefully have a higher return available for the creditors and shareholders than would have been the case if the business was liquidated before undertaking any business rescue proceedings.

To give a business the maximum chance of recovering its finances and to continue operating as a solvent enterprise, the business rescue plan normally restructures a business’ assets, liabilities and equity, as well as its way of doing business.

Who can be appointed as a business rescue practitioner?

There is a list of licensed business rescue practitioners available on the CIPC’s website.

What does a business rescue practitioner do?

The appointed business rescue practitioner will investigate the business’ situation and propose a business rescue plan. After the business rescue plan has been approved by the creditors and shareholders, the business rescue practitioner will implement the plan. The reason why the creditors and shareholders must approve the business rescue plan is that they will withhold their rights against the business to claim payment as long as the business is operating under the business rescue plan.

After implementing the business rescue plan, the business rescue practitioner will temporarily oversee and manage the business together with the current management.

The business rescue practitioner also takes over dealing with the creditors and shareholders. In addition, the business rescue practitioner will communicate with registered trade unions which represent employees of the business. If there are employees who are not members of any registered trade union, the business rescue practitioner will deal with these employees or their representatives as well.

The first step to start with a business rescue is for a business to file a notice with the CIPC that it wants to start with business rescue proceedings. The rest of the business rescue process and the business rescue documents which are required to be submitted to the CIPC, is set out on the CIPC’s website.

Reference list:

This article is a general information sheet and should not be used or relied on as legal or other professional advice. No liability can be accepted for any errors or omissions nor for any loss or damage arising from reliance upon any information herein. Always contact your legal adviser for specific and detailed advice. Errors and omissions excepted (E&OE)

Commencement of business rescue proceedings

A3_bIs your company experiencing financial strain? Are creditors breathing down your neck? Business Rescue proceedings may be a solution to your problems.

Business Rescue is a new approach that is governed by the Companies Act 71 of 2008 (“the new Companies Act”) with the aim of assisting companies which are experiencing financial strain and are unable to pay their creditors in the ordinary course of business. This article will look at what Business Rescue encompasses, as well as how Business Rescue proceedings are commenced.

Section 128(1) (b) of the Companies Act defines Business Rescue proceedings as proceedings to facilitate the rehabilitation of a company that is financially distressed by providing, inter alia, temporary supervision of a company under a Business Rescue practitioner.

The role of the Business Rescue practitioner (who must be appointed within 5 days after the company has been placed under Business Rescue) is to ensure that the company complies fully with the steps to be taken once Business Rescue proceedings have commenced. They must also ensure that everything reasonably possible is being done (including the drafting of a Business Rescue plan) to assist the company in getting out of its current state of financial strain and into a position where it will be able to pay its creditors in the ordinary course of business.

The new Companies Act stipulates that, in order to place a company under Business Rescue, a resolution must be taken by the Board of Directors and an application thereto must be made to the CIPC (Companies and Intellectual Property Commission). The Commissioner must then consider the application and approve or reject it. Alternatively, any interested or affected party may apply to the Court for a court order placing the company under Business Rescue.

A company that is under Business Rescue is protected from creditors in that no legal action or proceedings may be taken against a company that has commenced with Business Rescue proceedings.

It is imperative to note that a lack of full compliance with the requirements in respect of Business Rescue proceedings may render the Business Rescue proceedings null and void. This position was reiterated in the High Court case of Advanced Technologies & Engineering Company (Pty) Ltd v Aeronautique et Technologies Embarquees SAS (unreported CASE NO 72522/20110), and the Court further held that the new Companies Act does not provide for condonation of non-compliance with the requirements.

References:

  • Companies Act 71 of 2008
  • D Davis, W Geach, T Mongalo, D Butler, A Loubser, L Coetzee, D Burdette, 3rd Edition (2013) Commercial law: Companies and other Business Structures in South Africa.

This article is a general information sheet and should not be used or relied on as legal or other professional advice. No liability can be accepted for any errors or omissions nor for any loss or damage arising from reliance upon any information herein. Always contact your legal adviser for specific and detailed advice. Errors and omissions excepted (E&OE)