Tag Archives: Company

EMAIL MANAGEMENT SYSTEM? GET IT BEFORE IT GETS YOU

A2If your company uses emails to communicate with clients, then it’s not enough to just rely on traditional ways of managing email, such as backing up emails periodically. There needs to be a well-equipped email management system in place that will keep your business safe.

The key point that relates to the heavy use of email, is the maintenance of the integrity of the email, and being able to prove that integrity. Unfortunately, you can’t simply do nothing and leave your email system as is and hope for the best. Firstly, it is important to understand the legal requirements. This includes the Electronic Communications and Transaction Act, 2002, or the ECT Act.

The ECT Act provides that information is not without legal force and effect simply because it is in electronic form. These are some of the rules set out by the ECT Act regarding electronic communications.

  1. An electronic document must be captured, retained and retrievable.
  2. Electronic documents must be accessible so as to be useable for subsequent reference, this includes the origin, destination, date and time it was sent or received.
  3. If a signature is required, it must be accompanied by an authentication service.

So what should you do?

All companies who wish to comply with the regulations should implement an effective email management system. The core requirements of a good email management system are as follows:

  1. The ability to monitor and intercept email;
  2. Effective capturing of all email;
  3. Cost effective storage of all email and efficient discarding of email that has lost its business value or is no longer required for legal or regulatory or compliance;
  4. Efficient and cost effective restoration of email;
  5. The ability to maintain the integrity of email and the contents thereof; and
  6. The ability to audit email use in order to be able to prove integrity.

Although it seems like a trivial matter, it is worthwhile to implement an email management system in your company. It will help protect your business in the event that you need a record of communication due to an incident or contract dispute. New regulations introduced by POPI will also make this a necessary part of how your company handles information.

Reference:

  • The Electronic Communications and Transaction Act, 2002

This article is a general information sheet and should not be used or relied on as legal or other professional advice. No liability can be accepted for any errors or omissions nor for any loss or damage arising from reliance upon any information herein. Always contact your legal adviser for specific and detailed advice. Errors and omissions excepted (E&OE)

IS YOUR BUSINESS LEGALLY COMPLIANT?

A2Compliance refers to a company obeying all of the legal laws and regulations regarding how they manage the business, their staff, and their treatment towards their consumers. The point of compliance is to make sure that corporations act responsibly.

Is compliance for every business the same?

Certain businesses may be required by law to register with an industry association. For instance, if you want to practice as a public auditor and issue an opinion on assurance engagements, you must be registered with the South African Institute of Chartered Accountants (SAICA) and the Independent Regulatory Board of Auditors (IRBA). Compliance in this regard would depend on the type of business involved.

What are general requirements for all businesses:

Tax compliance (SARS, VAT Act) – First and foremost, the business enterprise must be registered with SARS for tax purposes (to be taxed on the income that it makes), secondly, if the business is an employer it must register itself as such and as an agent of government required to deduct employees’ tax from the earnings of employees and pay the amounts deducted over to SARS on a monthly basis. Thirdly, if applicable, a business may register for VAT in terms of the VAT Act.

The Occupational Health and Safety Act – The government requires businesses that employ people to provide a work environment that is safe and without risk to the health of employees.

Skills Development Levy (SDL) – Employers must pay 1 percent of their workers’ pay to the skills development levy every month. The money goes to Sector Education and Training Authorities (SETAs) and the Skills Development Fund to pay for training.

The Compensation for Occupational Injuries and Diseases Act (COIDA) – This Act seeks to ensure that employers are duly covered to provide compensation for disablement caused by occupational injuries or diseases sustained by employees in the course of their employment, or for death resulting from such injuries or diseases.

Unemployment Insurance Fund (UIF) – Employers must register with the Department of Labour to ensure that their employees are appropriately covered when out of employment.

Auditing requirements – Depending on the type of company you register, it may be required to be audited on an annual basis.

Financial Intelligence Centre Act (FICA) – If your company will be engaged with financial services, estate agencies, insurance, etc. you are required to comply with this Act in order to combat money laundering.

References:

This article is a general information sheet and should not be used or relied on as legal or other professional advice. No liability can be accepted for any errors or omissions nor for any loss or damage arising from reliance upon any information herein. Always contact your legal adviser for specific and detailed advice. Errors and omissions excepted (E&OE)

WHO MAY BE APPOINTED AS DIRECTOR?

A2_b_MarCertain people are not eligible to be appointed as directors of a company. In this article we look at who is disqualified from being a director as well as the effects of the actions of such persons while still acting as director.

A company must not knowingly permit an ineligible or disqualified person to serve or act as a director, according to section 69(3) of the Companies Act 71 of 2008. “Knowingly” includes the situation where the company should reasonably have known that the person is ineligible or disqualified.

Section 69(7) lists the persons on which there are an absolute prohibition, being juristic persons, minors or any persons disqualified in terms of the Memorandum of Incorporation. Section 69(8) lists the persons that are disqualified on a temporary basis, being someone who has been prohibited by the court or whom the court has declared a delinquent, unrehabilitated insolvents, persons who were removed from an office of trust on the grounds of misconduct involving dishonesty, and persons who were found guilty of a criminal offence and imprisoned without the option of a fine, or were ordered to pay a higher fine for being found guilty of any dishonesty crimes.[1]

A question that arises here is what the effect would be of appointing a prohibited director. Section 69(4) says that a person immediately ceases to be a director if they are prohibited from being a director, but section 71(3) states that if a shareholder alleges that a person is disqualified then the person must be removed by a board resolution before they cease to be a director. This means that any act done by such a person, despite his disqualification, will be valid and binding on the company unless the third party who was involved in the act was aware that the person they were dealing with was disqualified.[2]

Section 162(5) (a)-(f) sets out the grounds for an order of delinquency. A court must make an order declaring a person to be a delinquent director if the person:

  1. consented to serve as a director, or acted in the capacity of a director or prescribed officer, while ineligible or disqualified to be a director;
  2. acted as a director in a manner that contravened an order of probation;
  3. grossly abused the position of director while being a director;
  4. took personal advantage of information or an opportunity, or intentionally or by gross negligence inflicted harm upon the company or a subsidiary while being a director;
  5. acted in a manner that amounted to gross negligence, wilful misconduct or breach of trust while being a director; or as contemplated in section 77(3) (a), (b) or (c);
  6. has repeatedly been personally subject to a compliance notice or similar enforcement mechanism;
  7. has been convicted of an offence at least twice, or subjected to an administrative fine or similar penalty; or
  8. was a director of a company or a managing member of a close corporation, or controlled or participated in the control of a juristic person that was convicted of an offence, or subjected to a fine or similar penalty, within a period of five years. [3] & [4]

If a person is declared a delinquent in terms of section 162(5) (a) or (b) it is unconditional and for the lifetime of the person. If a person is declared a delinquent in terms of section 162(5) (c)-(f) this is temporary for a minimum of 7 years.[5]

It is therefore very important, when appointing a director, to make sure that he is qualified in terms of the new Companies Act. One must do proper research about a person accordingly before appointing him as a director of a company because it is possible that if you do not do so, the company in which you are a shareholder may have to bear the consequences of the actions of this disqualified person.

References:

l Companies Act 71 of 2008

l FHI Cassim et al Contemporary Company Law (2012)

[1] Section 69(7) – (8) of the Companies Act 71 of 2008.

[2] Section 69(4) and 71(3) of the Companies Act 71 of 2008.

[3] Section 162(5) (a)-(f) of the Companies Act.

[4] FHI Cassim et al Contemporary Company Law (2012) 435 – 437.

[5] FHI Cassim et al Contemporary Company Law (2012) 438.

This article is a general information sheet and should not be used or relied on as professional advice. No liability can be accepted for any errors or omissions nor for any loss or damage arising from reliance upon any information herein. Always contact your legal adviser for specific and detailed advice. Errors and omissions excepted. (E&OE)

SUCCESSION PLANNING

A2_bOwning a business requires careful succession planning and is part of your estate planning as you have to determine who will succeed you, or who will purchase your shares, or who will be entitled to the income after your death. The future ownership of your business is at stake.

A Partnership automatically dissolves upon the death of a partner and the remaining partners will then have to dissolve it and divide the assets amongst them.

In the case of a Company the shareholders may agree that:

  1. The remaining shareholders have a right of first refusal to purchase the deceased shareholder’s shareholding, as opposed to dealing with it in a will.
  2. The future of ownership of shares can be regulated by a written agreement between shareholders that is referred to as “buy and sell” agreement and has an influence at the death of a partner or shareholder.
  3. The buy and sell agreement compels the executor of the deceased to offer the shares at a pre-determined price, and life policies between shareholders normally cover the purchase price.
  4. The remaining shareholders are the beneficiaries of the policy on the life of the deceased and use it to purchase the shares, normally pro rata to the shares they already own.
  5. Buy and sell policies fall outside the deceased estate and are not subject to estate duty provided that three requirements are met:
  • None of the premiums should have been paid by the deceased;
  • The shareholder relationship must have existed at the time of death;
  • A written agreement must exist.
  1. When the skill and knowledge of a partner is essential for the survival of the business, “key man insurance“ can be taken out on the life of such a partner or shareholder. The premiums are paid by the business and the benefit is paid to the business to prevent financial loss or to appoint and train a replacement.

In the case of a “sole proprietor”, succession planning is dealt with in the Last Will and Testament.

  1. All the value of the business vests in the deceased estate.
  2. Planning is essential as the business terminates at death, although the executor may sell it as a going concern.
  3. It is a good idea to grant a right of first refusal to an associate, who can purchase the business and intellectual capital at the time of the death.
  4. A life policy can provide for cover on the life of the owner, with the associate being the beneficiary, and the proceeds at time of the death utilised to purchase the business.
  5. It deserves no debate that planning increases the benefit for the estate as opposed to closing the business down, where the assets will be worth far less.

Continued succession planning must be part of your business strategy to ensure your hard work benefits the right people.

This article is a general information sheet and should not be used or relied on as legal or other professional advice. No liability can be accepted for any errors or omissions nor for any loss or damage arising from reliance upon any information herein. Always contact your legal adviser for specific and detailed advice. Errors and omissions excepted (E&OE)