WHY IS MY PROPERTY TRANSFER TAKING SO LONG?

A1After signing a deed of sale, the purchasers often want to move into the property as soon as possible.  When they are informed of the process involved prior to the property being transferred this may damper their excitement. There may also be delays in the transaction.   In order to avoid unnecessary frustration, it is vital that parties to the transaction understand the processes involved and that delays are sometimes inevitable.

The deed of sale will normally be the starting point in a transaction for a conveyancer who has been instructed to attend to the transfer.  This conveyancer is also known as the transferring attorney and is normally the main link between the other attorneys involved the transfer transaction.

Postponements, delays and interruptions

  1. A major role of the conveyancer is informing any mortgagees, for example banks, about the transfer so that any notice periods for the cancellation of bonds can start running. The notice period is usually up to 90 days. The transfer may be delayed as a result of this notice period.
  1. Obtaining the various certificates, receipts and consents applicable to the transaction in question also takes time. Examples of these is the rate clearance certificate, transfer duty receipt, homeowners’ association’s consent to the transfer, levy clearance certificate, electrical compliance certificate and plumbing certificate. The time it takes to obtain these certificates will differ from case to case. After an inspection by a plumber or electrician, for example, it may be found that certain work needs to be carried out before the certificates will be issued.
  1. Once all the documents are lodged at the Deeds Office by the conveyancer, an internal process is followed, which has different time frames in the various Deeds Offices. This time frame can also vary in a particular Deeds Office. It is best to enquire from your conveyancer what the Deeds Office time frame is at any given stage.

There are many ways in which the transfer process could be delayed, these are just some of the examples. If you feel that the process is taking too long, then you should contact your conveyancer.

Reference:

  • Aktebesorging, UNISA 2004, Department Private Law, Ramwell, Brink & West

This article is a general information sheet and should not be used or relied on as legal or other professional advice. No liability can be accepted for any errors or omissions nor for any loss or damage arising from reliance upon any information herein. Always contact your legal adviser for specific and detailed advice. (E&OE)

EMAIL MANAGEMENT SYSTEM? GET IT BEFORE IT GETS YOU

A2If your company uses emails to communicate with clients, then it’s not enough to just rely on traditional ways of managing email, such as backing up emails periodically. There needs to be a well-equipped email management system in place that will keep your business safe.

The key point that relates to the heavy use of email, is the maintenance of the integrity of the email, and being able to prove that integrity. Unfortunately, you can’t simply do nothing and leave your email system as is and hope for the best. Firstly, it is important to understand the legal requirements. This includes the Electronic Communications and Transaction Act, 2002, or the ECT Act.

The ECT Act provides that information is not without legal force and effect simply because it is in electronic form. These are some of the rules set out by the ECT Act regarding electronic communications.

  1. An electronic document must be captured, retained and retrievable.
  2. Electronic documents must be accessible so as to be useable for subsequent reference, this includes the origin, destination, date and time it was sent or received.
  3. If a signature is required, it must be accompanied by an authentication service.

So what should you do?

All companies who wish to comply with the regulations should implement an effective email management system. The core requirements of a good email management system are as follows:

  1. The ability to monitor and intercept email;
  2. Effective capturing of all email;
  3. Cost effective storage of all email and efficient discarding of email that has lost its business value or is no longer required for legal or regulatory or compliance;
  4. Efficient and cost effective restoration of email;
  5. The ability to maintain the integrity of email and the contents thereof; and
  6. The ability to audit email use in order to be able to prove integrity.

Although it seems like a trivial matter, it is worthwhile to implement an email management system in your company. It will help protect your business in the event that you need a record of communication due to an incident or contract dispute. New regulations introduced by POPI will also make this a necessary part of how your company handles information.

Reference:

  • The Electronic Communications and Transaction Act, 2002

This article is a general information sheet and should not be used or relied on as legal or other professional advice. No liability can be accepted for any errors or omissions nor for any loss or damage arising from reliance upon any information herein. Always contact your legal adviser for specific and detailed advice. Errors and omissions excepted (E&OE)

THE BASICS OF ESTATE DUTY

A3When a person dies, they leave behind an estate which includes everything they own. Estate Duty is payable on the estate of every person who dies and whose nett estate is in excess of R3,5 million. It is charged at the rate of 20%. Currently, SARS is responsible for collecting the Estate Duty of a deceased person.

How does an estate get reported to SARS?

Even if Estate Duty does not apply to you, it is still necessary to inform SARS that the person is deceased. It is recommended that you consult with a legal expert when going through such as process.

Copies of the following documents must be sent to SARS:

  • Death certificate or death notice.
  • Identity document of the deceased.
  • Letters of Executorship (J238) (if applicable).
  • Letter of Authority (J170) (in cases where the estate is less than R250 000).
  • Certified copy of the executor’s identity document.
  • Power of attorney (if applicable).
  • The name, address and contact details of the executor or agent.
  • The last Will and Testament of the deceased.
  • An inventory of the deceased’s assets.
  • The liquidation and distribution accounts (if available).

These documents may be sent to the relevant Centralised Processing Centres that is closest to the Master of the High Court where the estate is being administered.

How does Estate Duty work in relation to an inheritance?

All income received or accrued before the deceased’s death is taxable in the hands of the deceased up until the date of death, and will be administered by the executor or administrator acting as the deceased’s representative taxpayer.

  • After the date of death of a person, a new taxable entity comes into existence – the “estate”.
  • The assets of the deceased will be held by the estate until the liquidation and distribution account has lain for inspection and become final under section 35(12) of the Administration of Estates Act after which the assets will be either handed over to the heirs or delivered to the trustee of a trust estate.

References:

This article is a general information sheet and should not be used or relied on as legal or other professional advice. No liability can be accepted for any errors or omissions nor for any loss or damage arising from reliance upon any information herein. Always contact your legal adviser for specific and detailed advice. Errors and omissions excepted (E&OE)

AM I STILL LIABLE FOR MY SPOUSE’S DEBT AFTER DIVORCE?

A4A husband and wife buy a house together. Their marriage takes a tumble, along with their ­finances, and they have to sell their home and are left with an outstanding mortgage bond. They subsequently got divorced. The couple is concerned about what will happen to the debts and who will be ­responsible for paying them.

Who pays what after divorce?

If the couple was married in ­community of property, the debt on the property is a joint debt. They will be jointly and severally liable. This means that each partner is not just liable for half the debt now that they are divorced, in fact the bank can seek the full amount from either of them. The one spouse who is held liable by the bank would then have a claim of 50% of the debt against the other, but it would be his or her responsibility to collect that debt (not the bank’s). Alternatively, the bank may agree to accept 50% from one person and release them from the ­liability, but it does not have to.

Sometimes, the divorce settlement makes a special mention of the mortgage. But if there is no clause in the divorce, the joint liability principle applies. After a divorce, the husband and wife should present their bank with a copy of the divorce settlement. This will remove any uncertainty about ownership and liability for bond payments.

Getting divorced while under debt review

If you get divorced while you are under debt review and you have the debt review court order in place, then this will need to be rescinded and for new debt counselling applications to be started, as in order to follow on with the debt counselling process you will need to reapply, but will now need to be seen as two single applications. A new budget and new proposals will also have to be drawn up.

References:

  • “Debt And Divorce”. News24. N.p., 2017. Web. 12 June 2017.
  • “Debt Review After A Divorce Settlement – Debt Review”. Debtbusters. N.p., 2017. Web. 13 June 2017.

This article is a general information sheet and should not be used or relied on as legal or other professional advice. No liability can be accepted for any errors or omissions nor for any loss or damage arising from reliance upon any information herein. Always contact your legal adviser for specific and detailed advice. Errors and omissions excepted (E&OE)

CAN MY PROPERTY BE USED FOR AIRBNB?

A1When deciding whether to become an Airbnb host, it’s important for you to understand how the laws work in your city.

According to Brett Herron, the mayoral committee member for transport and urban development at the City of Cape Town, different holiday accommodation land use types, such as B&Bs and guest houses, are regulated by the City’s zoning scheme, called the Development Management Scheme.

If referring to Cape Town, for instance, the city has a Guest Accommodation Policy that sets out the guidelines that have to be considered when applications are made to obtain the necessary planning permissions. According to the Policy, if you wanted to provide a self-catering, flexible accommodation option in line with current trends for transient guests, visitors and tourists, then these are the guidelines that should be followed:

Purpose

  • A building or group of buildings consisting of separate accommodation units rented for residential purposes, each incorporating a kitchenette / full kitchen, but may also include an option of meals being provided communally to guests.
  • May include communal areas for the exclusive use by lodgers / transient guests.

 Scale

  • Form and scale of development determined by development parameters of particular zone (i.e. floor space, building lines, height) and the site context.
  • No general restriction on number of units, but must be locally appropriate in context of the building/site characteristics and surrounding area.
  • Council may determine / restrict the number of units per development in cases and lay down conditions necessary to mitigate the impact thereof.

 Location

  • Not supported on a single residential zoned property, subject site must have suitable general residential, mixed use or commercial zoning.
  • Locational criteria that should be considered, include:
    • proximity to public transport routes, commercial centres and tourist activities.
    • character of the surrounding area;
    • mixed use or commercial locations (including areas designated for high density development) are encouraged.

Conclusion

In many cities, you must register, get a permit, or obtain a licence before you can list your property or accept guests. Certain types of short-term bookings may be prohibited altogether. Local municipalities may also vary greatly in how they enforce these laws. However, it is not impossible to list your property on Airbnb, you just have to find out from the local municipality if you have the correct permissions and if the property has the correct zoning.

References:

  • Guest Accommodation Policy, the City of Cape Town, Department of Planning & Building Development Management.
  • “Regulating Airbnb in Cape Town”, Jan Vermeulen, MyBroadband. https://mybroadband.co.za/news/government/210884-regulating-airbnb-in-cape-town.html

This article is a general information sheet and should not be used or relied on as legal or other professional advice. No liability can be accepted for any errors or omissions nor for any loss or damage arising from reliance upon any information herein. Always contact your legal adviser for specific and detailed advice. Errors and omissions excepted (E&OE)

IS YOUR BUSINESS LEGALLY COMPLIANT?

A2Compliance refers to a company obeying all of the legal laws and regulations regarding how they manage the business, their staff, and their treatment towards their consumers. The point of compliance is to make sure that corporations act responsibly.

Is compliance for every business the same?

Certain businesses may be required by law to register with an industry association. For instance, if you want to practice as a public auditor and issue an opinion on assurance engagements, you must be registered with the South African Institute of Chartered Accountants (SAICA) and the Independent Regulatory Board of Auditors (IRBA). Compliance in this regard would depend on the type of business involved.

What are general requirements for all businesses:

Tax compliance (SARS, VAT Act) – First and foremost, the business enterprise must be registered with SARS for tax purposes (to be taxed on the income that it makes), secondly, if the business is an employer it must register itself as such and as an agent of government required to deduct employees’ tax from the earnings of employees and pay the amounts deducted over to SARS on a monthly basis. Thirdly, if applicable, a business may register for VAT in terms of the VAT Act.

The Occupational Health and Safety Act – The government requires businesses that employ people to provide a work environment that is safe and without risk to the health of employees.

Skills Development Levy (SDL) – Employers must pay 1 percent of their workers’ pay to the skills development levy every month. The money goes to Sector Education and Training Authorities (SETAs) and the Skills Development Fund to pay for training.

The Compensation for Occupational Injuries and Diseases Act (COIDA) – This Act seeks to ensure that employers are duly covered to provide compensation for disablement caused by occupational injuries or diseases sustained by employees in the course of their employment, or for death resulting from such injuries or diseases.

Unemployment Insurance Fund (UIF) – Employers must register with the Department of Labour to ensure that their employees are appropriately covered when out of employment.

Auditing requirements – Depending on the type of company you register, it may be required to be audited on an annual basis.

Financial Intelligence Centre Act (FICA) – If your company will be engaged with financial services, estate agencies, insurance, etc. you are required to comply with this Act in order to combat money laundering.

References:

This article is a general information sheet and should not be used or relied on as legal or other professional advice. No liability can be accepted for any errors or omissions nor for any loss or damage arising from reliance upon any information herein. Always contact your legal adviser for specific and detailed advice. Errors and omissions excepted (E&OE)

PLANNING YOUR ESTATE AS NEWLYWEDS

A3For newlyweds, one of the most important tasks to attend to is estate planning. The estate planning will depend on what the couple wants and what form of marriage they are in. It is therefore important to keep the following in mind when planning the years ahead together.

Marriage in community of property

There is a joint estate, with each spouse having a 50 percent share in each and every asset in the estate (no matter in whose name it is registered);

  1. In the event of the death of one spouse, the surviving spouse will have a claim for 50 percent of the value of the combined estate. The estate is divided after all the debts have been settled in a deceased estate.
  2. When drafting a Last Will and Testament, spouses married in community of property need to be aware that it is only half of any asset that he or she is able to bequeath.
  3. Upon the death of one spouse, all banking accounts are frozen (even if they are in the name of one of the spouses), which could affect liquidity.

Marriage out of community of property without the accrual system

Each estate planner (spouse) retains possession of assets owned prior to the marriage. Each spouse’s estate is completely separated, even in the event of death. If you want your spouse to inherit something, you would need to outline this in your Will.

Marriage out of community of property with the accrual system

This is identical to a “marriage out of community of property” but the accrual system will be applicable. The accrual system is a formula that is used to calculate how much the larger estate must pay the smaller estate once the marriage comes to an end through death or divorce.

This article is a general information sheet and should not be used or relied on as legal or other professional advice. No liability can be accepted for any errors or omissions nor for any loss or damage arising from reliance upon any information herein. Always contact your legal adviser for specific and detailed advice. (E&OE)

MY EX’S NEW PARTNER IS ABUSIVE TO MY CHILDREN

A4It is important for a child to have access to both parents, and in a situation where both parents were actively involved in the child’s life, the access to both parents should be as equal as possible. As much as you don’t want to pry on your ex’s time with your children, what should you do if your ex’s new partner is abusive towards your child? Section 28(1)(d) of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa states that every child has the right to be protected from maltreatment, neglect, abuse or degradation.

What defines abuse?

  • Physical Abuse: This type of abuse is one where the abuser conducts an act which leads to physical bodily harm such as bruises, cuts, burns and fractures.
  • Emotional Abuse: Emotional abuse constitutes domestic violence, and is identified as a pattern of degrading or humiliating conduct towards the child.
  • Verbal Abuse: This kind of abuse may be harder to differentiate from emotional abuse; verbal abuse is the act towards the child, and emotional abuse is the result.

What to do?

A parent cannot stop the other parent from having access to a child. Visitation must be in accordance with the parenting plan. The Children’s Act stipulates that the rights of the children are the most important, and their rights should be protected, promoted and respected. The child’s emotional and intellectual needs are considered when making decisions about what is best for the child.

  • Firstly, try to speak to the person whom you have joint custody with, to try to come up with a solution before approaching legal representatives.
  • If this fails, report the suspected abuse. This report will serve in your child’s favour when in court.
  • Apply for the amendment of the parenting plan. This can include limited visitation which should be administered through the Office of the Family Advocate.
  • Only three people may request amendment or termination of the agreement:
  1. Parents of the child,
  2. The child, or
  3. A person who is acting in the interest of the child.
  • Rights can be minimised or terminated by the court

References:

  • The Children’s Act Explained. (2017). [ebook] p.3. Available at: http://www.justice.gov.za/vg/children/dsd-Children_Act_ExplainedBooklet1_June2009.pdf [Accessed 12 Jun. 2017].

This article is a general information sheet and should not be used or relied on as legal or other professional advice. No liability can be accepted for any errors or omissions nor for any loss or damage arising from reliance upon any information herein. Always contact your legal adviser for specific and detailed advice. Errors and omissions excepted (E&OE)