Category Archives: Trusts

THE BENEFITS OF CREATING A TRUST

A4bTrusts are well-known to facilitate effective estate planning and continuity planning strategies. That said, setting up a trust – whether an inter vivos (between the living) or a testamentary (created in a will) − should be carefully considered and not just implemented blindly.

The difference between testamentary and inter vivos trusts

  • A testamentary trust is established when a person (the founder) makes provision for establishing a trust in their will. The trust does not come into existence until the founder dies.
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  • An inter vivos trust is set up between the living. In other words, property is transferred before death to the trust by its founder and managed by the trustees for the benefit of another person or persons.

The death benefits of creating an inter vivos trust exceeds the cost – both in time and money. According to The Estate Duty Act, upon death, a duty is levied against your estate known as estate duty. The nett value of any estate will be determined by deducting all liabilities from your assets of your estate, both real and deemed.

Should you create a testamentary trust, upon death the assets are in your name and will need to be transferred to the trust posthumously, meaning all assets are taken into account when assessing the duty payable.

Advantages

Taking the above into account, here are some benefits you could experience from creating a trust:

  • Reducing estate duty:
    Inter vivos trusts can be used to minimise estate duty. No estate duty should be payable on assets owned by the trust as a trust does not die.
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  • Protection against creditors:
    As the trust’s assets are not owned by the beneficiaries, creditors do not have a claim on the assets. This advantage is especially important for people who could be exposed to potential liability. Companies as well as individuals are able to transfer assets into trusts.
    .
  • Efficient succession:
    Since trusts never die, beneficiaries will be able to continue enjoying the assets if one beneficiary were to pass away.

Disadvantages

Despite the advantages, there are also some disadvantages of having a trust. They include the following:

  • Costs:
    The costs of setting up a trust can be high. If assets are transferred into the trust, then transfer duty needs to also be paid.
    .
  • Duties of trustees:
    Trustees could find themselves personally liable for losses suffered by the trust if it can be proven that they did not act with care, diligence and skill according to Section 9 of the Trust Property Control Act.

References:

This article is a general information sheet and should not be used or relied on as legal or other professional advice. No liability can be accepted for any errors or omissions nor for any loss or damage arising from reliance upon any information herein. Always contact your legal adviser for specific and detailed advice. Errors and omissions excepted (E&OE)

WHAT SEPARATES INTER-VIVOS TRUSTS WITH TESTAMENTARY TRUSTS?

a3bA trust is the ideal long-term structure with which to protect assets from generation to generation while it effects a saving in terms of estate duty. Estate duty is the levy payable on all your assets upon your death.

An inter-vivos trust

An inter-vivos trust is also known as a living or family trust as it is set up during your lifetime. A big advantage of an inter-vivos trust is that it offers protection in case of a summons because the assets in the trust are excluded from such claims. When assets are bought through a trust or transferred to a trust, capital growth takes place within the trust which is excluded from your estate. This means that the assets within your estate can grow within the trust without causing higher estate duty for your estate.

It is recommended that you transfer growth assets to a trust by selling or donating them to the trust. The value of these assets sold to the trust will then be owed to you (or your estate) by the trust in the form of a loan account. The value of the loan account can be decreased successfully by R100 000 per year by paying the annual exempt amount of donations tax to the trust. The trust will pay back the amount of the donation to you in partial redemption of the loan account owed to you.

The disadvantage of an inter-vivos trust

The biggest drawback of the trust is the fact that full control of your assets is lost. As original owner you now become a co-trustee and possibly one of the beneficiaries of the trust. The co-trustees also have a say regarding the assets which had previously been controlled and managed only by you.

A testamentary trust

A testamentary trust differs from an inter-vivos trust in that it is set up according to someone’s will and would therefore only be activated once that person dies. The main aim of a testamentary trust is to protect the interests of the beneficiaries (who are often minors).

The trustees of the testamentary trust gain control of the assets and manage and administrate the assets in terms of the stipulations of the testamentary trust. This would be to the advantage and in the best interest of the beneficiaries. Testamentary trusts are usually terminated as soon as the trust’s beneficiaries reach the age as dictated in terms of the will, as opposed to inter-vivos trusts, which can last for indefinite periods.

This article is a general information sheet and should not be used or relied on as legal or other professional advice. No liability can be accepted for any errors or omissions nor for any loss or damage arising from reliance upon any information herein. Always contact your legal adviser for specific and detailed advice. Errors and omissions excepted (E&OE)

HOW DO I REGISTER A TRUST?

a1_bA trust is an agreement between the person who owns the assets and the appointed trustees. A trust can be a good way to preserve your wealth for your family and children. A well-managed trust will make sure that anyone who is a beneficiary of the trust benefits from it. The trustees have the important job to administer the trust and its assets objectively with the best interests of the beneficiaries in mind.

Trusts and their administration fall under the Trust Property Control Act no 57/1988.

What types of trusts are there?

It’s important to note that there are two types of trusts. An inter vivos trust and a testamentary trust. A testamentary trust is one that’s formed from the will of a deceased person. In the case of a testamentary trust the deceased’s last will serves as the trust document. An inter vivos trust is created between living persons, and will form the basis of this article. Inter vivos trusts can limit estate duty and preserve your assets and wealth for your descendants. Certain financial institutions assist in setting up a trust and can act as trustees.

Registering an inter vivos trust

To register an inter vivos trust with the Master of the High Court, the following documents must be lodged.

1. Original trust deed or notarial certified copy thereof.
2. Proof of payment of R100 fee, for registration of a new Trust.
3. Completed Acceptance of Trusteeship (J417) and Acceptance of Auditor Application (J405) forms.
4. Bond of security by the trustees – form J344 (if required by the Master)

* There are no costs involved in amending an existing Trust.

These documents are also required for the Master to issue the trustees with letters of authority for administering the trust. A trustee may not proceed to administer the trust without the written authority of the Master.

If the trust’s assets or majority of its assets are located in a particular area, then the inter vivos trust has to be registered with the Master who has jurisdiction in that area.

De-registering of a trust

The Master can de-register the trust only once it has been terminated. The common law makes provision for the termination of a trust as the Trust Property Control Act makes no such provision. The following circumstances can be grounds for a trust to be terminated:

1. by statute
2. fulfilment of the object of the trust
3. failure of the beneficiary
4. renunciation or repudiation by the beneficiary
5. destruction of the trust property
6. the operation of a resolutive condition

You will still need the original letter of authority, bank statements reflecting a nil balance on the final statement and proof that the beneficiaries have received their benefits.

Administering the trust

Trustees are required to comply with the Trust Property Control Act, which determines how trusts should be administered and the role of the trustees. If trustees fail to comply with the Act they may face criminal prosecution. The trustees have to always act with the best interests of the beneficiaries in mind.

Some legal requirements of trustees include not being able to make secret profits, taking care and being objective when administering trust assets and always acting in good faith.

References:

This article is a general information sheet and should not be used or relied on as legal or other professional advice. No liability can be accepted for any errors or omissions nor for any loss or damage arising from reliance upon any information herein. Always contact your legal adviser for specific and detailed advice. Errors and omissions excepted (E&OE)

HOW DO I REGISTER A TRUST?

A trust is an agreement between the person who owns the assets and the appointed trustees. A trust can be a good way to preserve your wealth for your family and children. A well-managed trust will make sure that anyone who is a beneficiary of the trust benefits from it. The trustees have the important job to administer the trust and its assets objectively with the best interests of the beneficiaries in mind.

Trusts and their administration fall under the Trust Property Control Act no 57/1988.

What types of trusts are there?

It’s important to note that there are two types of trusts. An inter vivos trust and a testamentary trust. A testamentary trust is one that’s formed from the will of a deceased person. In the case of a testamentary trust the deceased's last will serves as the trust document. An inter vivos trust is created between living persons, and will form the basis of this article. Inter vivos trusts can limit estate duty and preserve your assets and wealth for your descendants. Certain financial institutions assist in setting up a trust and can act as trustees.

Registering an inter vivos trust

To register an inter vivos trust with the Master of the High Court, the following documents must be lodged.

  1. Original trust deed or notarial certified copy thereof.
  2. Proof of payment of R100 fee, for registration of a new Trust.
  3. Completed Acceptance of Trusteeship (J417) and Acceptance of Auditor Application (J405) forms.
  4. Bond of security by the trustees – form J344 (if required by the Master)

* There are no costs involved in amending an existing Trust.

These documents are also required for the Master to issue the trustees with letters of authority for administering the trust. A trustee may not proceed to administer the trust without the written authority of the Master.

If the trust’s assets or majority of its assets are located in a particular area, then the inter vivos trust has to be registered with the Master who has jurisdiction in that area.

De-registering of a trust

The Master can de-register the trust only once it has been terminated. The common law makes provision for the termination of a trust as the Trust Property Control Act makes no such provision. The following circumstances can be grounds for a trust to be terminated:

  1. by statute
  2. fulfilment of the object of the trust
  3. failure of the beneficiary
  4. renunciation or repudiation by the beneficiary
  5. destruction of the trust property
  6. the operation of a resolutive condition

You will still need the original letter of authority, bank statements reflecting a nil balance on the final statement and proof that the beneficiaries have received their benefits.

Administering the trust

Trustees are required to comply with the Trust Property Control Act, which determines how trusts should be administered and the role of the trustees. If trustees fail to comply with the Act they may face criminal prosecution. The trustees have to always act with the best interests of the beneficiaries in mind.

Some legal requirements of trustees include not being able to make secret profits, taking care and being objective when administering trust assets and always acting in good faith.

Reference:

Justice.gov.za. The Department of Justice and Constitutional Development, Administration of Trusts. [online] Available at: http://www.justice.gov.za/master/trust/ [Accessed 19/05/2016].

Sanlam.co.za. Sanlam Trusts. [online] Available at: https://www.sanlam.co.za/personal/financialplanning/willstrustsestates/Pages/trusts/ [Accessed 20/05/2016].

This article is a general information sheet and should not be used or relied on as legal or other professional advice. No liability can be accepted for any errors or omissions nor for any loss or damage arising from reliance upon any information herein. Always contact your legal adviser for specific and detailed advice. Errors and omissions excepted (E&OE)

THE IMPORTANCE OF THE INDEPENDENT TRUSTEE

A1_bA well-known court case, Land Bank of South Africa vs JL Parker and Two Others (the Parker case) irrevocably changed the requirements for independent trustees to be appointed and placed renewed focus on the duties and responsibilities of all trustees.

As a result of the Parker case, most Masters of the High Court now require an independent trustee to be appointed in addition to the trustees who are beneficiaries of the trust, and therefore will not issue a Letter of Appointment without at least one independent trustee being appointed. An independent trustee will be a person who is not related to the founder, the other trustees or the beneficiaries.

This independent trustee does not necessarily have to be a professional person but it must be someone who fully realises the responsibilities he or she is accepting when agreeing to act as a trustee, and is qualified in the view of the Master of the High Court to act as a trustee.

All trustees (independent or not) are charged with the responsibility to ensure that the trust functions properly to the greatest benefit of the beneficiaries. These responsibilities include, but are not limited to:

  1. ensuring compliance with the provisions of the trust deed;
  2. ensuring compliance with all statutory requirements;
  3. conducting of proper trustee meetings;
  4. recording of proper minutes of all meetings and decisions by the trustees;
  5. proper maintenance and safekeeping of minute books.

It is clear that a person who is appointed as an independent trustee must have the necessary experience and expertise to properly execute these duties as well as to add value to the trust. In many cases, the trustees who are not independent do not have sufficient knowledge of and experience in the proper administration of trusts. Furthermore, they might also lack expertise in utilising the vehicle of the trust in order to maximise the benefit for the beneficiaries.

This expertise includes negotiating and entering into business contracts, holistic tax and succession planning, and ensuring the optimal growth of the trust assets. It is in the best interest of the trust that this person also has sufficient knowledge of the impact of statutory requirements, such as compliance with relevant tax law and the effect of changes in legislation on the trust.

All trustees assume significant responsibility when accepting an appointment as a trustee and careful consideration must be given before accepting such an appointment. Any breach of fiduciary duties by any trustee, including the independent trustee, will result in significant exposure for the trustees. Furthermore, any action taken by the trustees on behalf of the trust while the proper number of trustees is not appointed by the Master of the High Court will be null and void.

This article is a general information sheet and should not be used or relied on as legal or other professional advice. No liability can be accepted for any errors or omissions nor for any loss or damage arising from reliance upon any information herein. Always contact your legal adviser for specific and detailed advice. Errors and omissions excepted (E&OE)