HOW THE VAT INCREASE AFFECTS YOUR BUSINESS

B4Consumers and suppliers have by now had an opportunity to familiarise themselves with the increased Value-Added Tax (VAT) rate of 15% since 1 April 2018. There are however many technical considerations related to the increase that remain unclear. One such an uncertainty is with regards to deposits paid prior to the effective date of the increase, while goods and services are only rendered thereafter.

VAT vendors often require that consumers pay a deposit to secure the future delivery of goods or services (for example, an advance payment for the manufacture of goods, bookings in advance for holidays or accommodation etc.). The deposit paid by the consumer is then off-set against the full purchase price once they eventually receive the goods or services. The question arises what VAT rate the consumer will finally be subject to, where they paid a deposit before 1 April 2018, but the actual delivery of goods or services only takes place thereafter.

The answer to this question is found in the time of supply rules contained in section 9 of the Value-Added Tax Act.[1] In terms thereof, the “time of supply” of goods and services is at the time an invoice is issued by a supplier, or the time any payment of consideration is received by the supplier, whichever is the earlier. Two important concepts stem from this rule.

Firstly, an “invoice” needs to be issued by a supplier. In terms of section 1 of the VAT Act, an “invoice” is a document notifying someone of an obligation to make payment. It is therefore not necessary that a “tax invoice” – which has very specific requirements – needs to be issued. If consumers received only a “booking confirmation”, “acknowledgment of receipt” or similar document prior to 1 April 2018 that did not demand payment (such as tax invoice or pro-forma invoice), the time of supply was not triggered, and consumers will be subject to the 15% VAT rate once the goods or services are finally delivered after 1 April 2018.

Secondly, any deposit that was paid by the consumer, would have had to be applied as “consideration” for the supply of the goods or services to constitute “payment”. In this regard, consumers are largely dependent on how VAT vendors account for deposits in their financial systems. If deposits are accounted for separately (which is often the case with refundable deposits or where there are conditions attached to the supply) and only recognised as a supply when goods or services are received by the consumer, the deposit (although a transfer of money has occurred), would not constitute “payment”. For example, the time of supply may only be triggered once a guest has completed their stay at a guest house after 1 April 2018, resulting in VAT being levied at 15%.

The take away from the time of supply rules is therefore that payment of a deposit prior to 1 April 2018 does not necessarily result in a supply at 14% VAT and the rate to be applied is dependent on the specific facts of each case. Both consumers and VAT vendors should also take note that there are a number of rate specific rules that apply during the transition phase, and are encouraged to seek advice from a tax professional when they are in doubt about the rate to be applied.

[1] 89 of 1991 (the “VAT-Act”)

This article is a general information sheet and should not be used or relied upon as professional advice. No liability can be accepted for any errors or omissions nor for any loss or damage arising from reliance upon any information herein. Always contact your financial adviser for specific and detailed advice.  Errors and omissions excepted (E&OE)

CHANGING BANKING DETAILS WITH SARS

B3In order to prevent fraud, the South African Revenue Service (“SARS”) requires confirmation of new or any changes to existing banking details and will only process any refunds due once these new details have been verified. (This often leads to frustration among taxpayers whose refunds are being withheld without notification of banking details that require verification.)

Taxpayers have various options available on how to proceed with this verification process. It can either be done in person at any SARS branch (if the person is not registered on eFiling) or the details can, in limited instances, be updated when completing the person’s income tax return (for both individuals and companies). The banking details can also be updated when requesting a transfer duty refund or by completing the relevant RAV01 form[1] on eFiling. SARS will not allow updates to the SARS system via other forms of communication (e.g. email, fax, post[2] or telephone).

Registering or changing of banking details for customs and excise clients cannot be done via eFiling. These taxpayers need to visit a SARS branch office and submit a completed DA185 application form[3] together with specific supporting documentation.

SARS will only accept as a valid bank account a cheque, savings or transmission account in the name of the relevant taxpayer. Credit card, bond and foreign bank accounts are not accepted.

Persons that are allowed to change banking details only include the relevant taxpayer, a registered representative of that taxpayer (whose details match those on the SARS system) or a registered tax practitioner acting on behalf of the taxpayer. A tax practitioner may not further delegate an employee to act on behalf of the client, but needs to be present him- or herself to request the necessary changes.[4] SARS lists certain exceptional circumstances where banking details may be changed by someone other than the aforementioned persons (for example, in the case of estates or where the taxpayer is a non-resident unable to go to a branch office).

SARS also provides detailed guidance on the supporting documentation what should be provided when changing banking details. Typically, this includes the original ID document of the taxpayer, a certified copy of that document and proof of the residential or business address of the taxpayer. The same is required of the registered representative or tax practitioner if applicable. SARS also requires the taxpayer to present bank statements of the account holder (not older than 3 months) as proof thereof that the bank details provided are correct.

To avoid having to stand in those long SARS queues (potentially, more than once) ask us to assist with this process.

[1] Registration, Amendment and Verification form

[2] This also includes placing documents in the drop-box at a SARS branch.

[3] Registration / Licensing of Customs and Excise

[4] See form ASPOA – Authority on Special Power of Attorney by Tax Practitioner.

This article is a general information sheet and should not be used or relied upon as professional advice. No liability can be accepted for any errors or omissions nor for any loss or damage arising from reliance upon any information herein. Always contact your financial adviser for specific and detailed advice.  Errors and omissions excepted (E&OE)

“BOOKING” CAPITAL LOSSES ON SHARES IS NOT THAT EASY

B2There is a number of techniques that taxpayers use to reduce their capital gains tax (CGT) exposure on long-term share investments. A common practice is to utilise the annual exclusion of R40 000 provided for in paragraph 5 of the Eighth Schedule of the Income Tax Act[1] by selling shares that have been bought at a low base cost, at a higher market value and then immediately reacquiring those shares at the same higher value, thereby ensuring that the investments’ base cost is increased by as much as R40 000 per year. If the gain on those shares is managed and kept below the annual R40 000 exclusion, taxpayers receive the benefit of a ‘step-up’ in the base cost of the shares to the higher value for future CGT purposes, without having incurred any tax cost.

A reverse scenario is to build up capital losses for off-set against any future capital gains and taxpayers are often advised, especially during times of market volatility, to ‘lock-in’ capital losses created by the expected temporary reduction in share prices. This involves selling shares at a loss and then immediately reacquiring the same shares at the lower base cost, but with the advantage of having created a capital loss – a technique known as ‘bed-and-breakfasting’.

Without placing an absolute restriction on ‘bed-and-breakfasting’, paragraph 42 of the Eighth Schedule limits the benefit that could have been obtained from the ‘locked-in’ capital loss. The limitations of paragraph 42 apply if, during a 45-day period either before or after the sale of the shares, a taxpayer acquires shares (or enters into a contract to acquire shares) of the same kind and of the same or equivalent quality. ‘Same kind’ and ‘same or equivalent quality’ includes the company in which the shares are held, the nature of the shares (ordinary shares vs preference shares) and the rights attached thereto.

The effect of paragraph 42 is twofold. Firstly, the seller is treated as having sold the shares at the same amount as its base cost, effectively disregarding any loss that it would otherwise have been able to book on the sale of the shares and utilise against other capital gains. Secondly, the purchaser must add the seller’s realised capital loss to the purchase price of the reacquired shares. The loss is therefore not totally foregone, but the benefit thereof (being an increased base cost of the shares acquired) is postponed to a future date when paragraph 42-time limitations do not apply.

Unfortunately, taxpayers do not receive guidance on complex matters such as these on yearly IT3C certificates or broker notes, since these are generally very generic. Therefore, taxpayers wishing to fully capitalise CGT exposure on market fluctuations are advised to consult with their tax practitioners prior to the sale of shares.

[1] No. 58 of 1962

This article is a general information sheet and should not be used or relied upon as professional advice. No liability can be accepted for any errors or omissions nor for any loss or damage arising from reliance upon any information herein. Always contact your financial adviser for specific and detailed advice.  Errors and omissions excepted (E&OE)

BUYING OUT SHAREHOLDERS

B1We are often approached by clients to advise on the most tax efficient manner in which a shareholder can sell an investment in a private company. Typically, the parties involve a majority shareholder of a company that is interested in buying out the minority shareholders in the company and which will ensure that that majority shareholder becomes the single remaining shareholder of that company.

In essence, two options are available through which a shareholder may dispose of a share in a company to achieve the above goal: it could either sell its shares to the purchasing shareholder, or it could sell the shares owned back to the company (i.e. a so-called “share buyback”). These two different options have varying tax consequences, and taxpayers should take care that these (often material) transactions are structured in the most tax appropriate manner possible.

Where a share is sold to another shareholder, the selling shareholder will simply pay a capital gains tax related cost. For companies, such capital gains tax related cost will effectively be 22.4% of the gains realised, whereas the rate for trusts is 36% (if gains are not distributed to beneficiaries), or up to 18% if the seller is an individual.

Where shares are however sold back to the company whose shares are being traded, that share buyback constitutes a dividend for tax purposes (to the extent that contributed tax capital is not used to fund that repurchase). Capital gains tax is therefore no longer relevant, but rather the dividends tax. Dividends would typically attract dividends tax (levied at 20%), rather than capital gains taxes.

It may therefore be beneficial for an existing shareholder (that is itself a company) to opt for its shares to be sold back to the company whose shares are held (and which shares are therefore effectively cancelled), rather than to sell these to the remaining shareholders and pay capital gains tax. This is because if the shares are sold to the remaining shareholders, a 22.4% capital gains tax related cost arises. However, where the shares are bought back, the “dividend” received by the company will be exempt from dividends tax and therefore no dividends tax should arise, since SA resident companies are exempt from the dividends tax altogether. A company selling its shares back to the entity in which it held the shares may therefore dispose of its investment without paying any tax whatsoever: no capital gains are realised since the shareholder receives a “dividend” for tax purposes, and the dividend itself is also exempt from dividends tax.

Share buybacks have become a hot topic recently and National Treasury has now moved to introduce certain specific anti-avoidance measures and reporting requirements that apply in certain circumstances. Still, there are perfectly legitimate ways in which to structure many corporate restructures where a buyout of shareholders takes place, and taxpayers will be well-advised to seek professional advice to ensure that such transactions are structured in as tax effective manner as possible.

This article is a general information sheet and should not be used or relied upon as professional advice. No liability can be accepted for any errors or omissions nor for any loss or damage arising from reliance upon any information herein. Always contact your financial adviser for specific and detailed advice.  Errors and omissions excepted (E&OE)

BUDGET 2018

B1Following the annual national budget speech delivered by Finance Minister Malusi Gigaba on 21 February, we highlight some of the most significant matters arising below:

  • The much-debated VAT rate has been increased from 14% to 15%, which was widely expected although hugely unpopular given the political sensitivity coupled with the effect that this will have on the poor;
  • The corporate income tax and transfer duty rates have been left unchanged;
  • The CGT inclusion rate (40% for individuals, 80% for companies or trusts) was left unchanged too (although we do expect these to go up to 50% / 100% in the near future);
  • “Bracket creeps” or “stealth taxes” had a significant impact on the current budget and refer to marginal tax brackets not being adjusted upwards for the effect of inflation annually. This year, no adjustments will be made to the top 4 tax brackets for individuals. Assuming that inflation is 6%, it will therefore be 6% “easier” for taxpayers to fall into a higher tax bracket compared to last year.
  • A new estate duty / donations tax bracket is to be introduced for donations or estates in excess of R30 million, and which will attract tax at 25%. Amounts below this threshold will still be taxed at the prevailing rate of 20%.
  • The above and other most significant changes can be summarised as follows:
  WAS NOW
Top marginal PIT rate 45% 45%
VAT rate 14% 15%
Tax rate for trusts 45% 45%
Estate duty for estates > R30m 20% 25%
CGT annual exclusion R40,000 R40,000
Primary rebate for individuals R13,635 R14,067

The Minister also alluded to the following matters which would be subject to legislative intervention or refinement during the course of the legislative year ahead:

  • Interaction of anti-avoidance rules relating to share buybacks and dividend stripping and the general reorganisation rules are to be reviewed, since current rules may affect legitimate transactions (especially in the preference share funding context);
  • Appropriateness of the current high tax exemption as part of the “controlled foreign company” (CFC) regime will be considered. However, legislation targeting foreign companies held by foreign trusts (which have SA resident beneficiaries) and classifying these as CFCs will be reintroduced;
  • To further encourage venture capital company investments, the appropriateness of the current passive investment income threshold is to be revisited, as well as the timing of the “group company” disqualification requirement;
  • The “official rate of interest” (used to calculate tax consequences of interest-free or low-interest loans), currently at prime less 2.5%, is to be increased; and
  • Further refinements will be made to the new “debt relief” legislation introduced in 2017 to remove anomalies.

This article is a general information sheet and should not be used or relied upon as professional advice. No liability can be accepted for any errors or omissions nor for any loss or damage arising from reliance upon any information herein. Always contact your financial adviser for specific and detailed advice.  Errors and omissions excepted (E&OE)

WITHDRAWAL OF VAT RELIEF FOR RESIDENTIAL PROPERTY DEVELOPERS

B2Section 18B of the Value-Added Tax Act[1] was introduced effective 10 January 2012 in a bid to grant relief for residential property developers caused by the slump in the property market at that time. Many property developers, registered for VAT, would develop residential properties with a view to dispose of these properties in the short-term as trading stock and as part of its VAT enterprise. However, following the global financial crisis of little less than a decade ago, many property developers found themselves in a position where they were increasingly forced to rent out residential properties once a development was completed due to the slower rate at which properties could be disposed of compared to earlier.

The letting of residential property is typically exempt from VAT. Due to a change in use of the properties therefore (albeit temporarily) from being held for sale as trading stock to now being put up to be let in the interim while being on market constituted a change in use of the properties. Due to the change in use of the properties, from being used to make taxable VAT supplies in the ordinary course of business and being sold as trading stock by the developer, to now being used to make VAT exempt supplies in the form of being used to generate residential rental income, the provisions of section 18(1) of the VAT Act would ordinarily have applied. In terms of section 18(1), where goods have been acquired previously for purposes of making VATable supplies, and these goods are subsequently used to make exempt supplies, the VAT vendor must be deemed to have disposed of all those assets for VAT purposes. In other words, even though no actual disposal of assets has taken place, such a disposal is deemed to take place for VAT purposes and which gives rise to output VAT having to be accounted and paid for by the developer based on the open market value of the property at that stage.[2]

As one could quite easily imagine, having to account for output VAT in these circumstances may be prohibitive, especially considering that the value of a property will likely have been enhanced due to the development and that VAT inputs thus far claimed by the developer would be overshadowed by the output VAT amount that is now required to be claimed.

It is in acknowledgement hereof that section 18B was introduced to the VAT Act in 2012. In terms of that provision, property developers were granted a 36-month grace period within which to sell properties, and during which time these residential properties could be rented out without a deemed supply being triggered for VAT purposes.

When introduced originally, it was made clear at that stage that the relief for temporary letting as explained above will only be in effect until 1 January 2018. However, it is arguable that the property market has not recovered sufficiently yet for the relief to be withdrawn at this stage.

[1] 89 of 1991

[2] Section 10(7) of the VAT Act

This article is a general information sheet and should not be used or relied upon as professional advice. No liability can be accepted for any errors or omissions nor for any loss or damage arising from reliance upon any information herein. Always contact your financial adviser for specific and detailed advice.  Errors and omissions excepted (E&OE)

ADDITIONAL MEDICAL EXPENSES TAX CREDIT

B3Section 6B of the Income Tax Act[1] provides for an additional medical expenses tax credit (“AMTC”) which is calculated against qualifying “out of pocket” medical expenses. This tax credit reduces the amount of income tax a natural person (hereinafter referred to as the “taxpayer”) is liable to pay. The AMTC is granted in addition to the medical scheme fees tax credit (“MTC”) in respect of fees paid to a registered medical scheme.[2]

The AMTC can be claimed by a taxpayer in respect of medical expenses incurred by that individual towards the medical expenses of that taxpayer as well as any of his or her dependants as defined. A “dependant” includes the spouse or partner of the taxpayer, any dependent children of the taxpayer or spouse, any other members of the taxpayer’s immediate family in respect of whom the taxpayer is liable for family care and support as well as any other person who is recognised as a dependant of the taxpayer under the rules of the relevant medical scheme.

In order for the expenses to qualify for the AMTC, the expenses must not have been recoverable by the taxpayer from any person (e.g. from the taxpayer’s medical scheme or an insurer under a medical gap cover insurance plan). Qualifying medical expenses can furthermore only be claimed in the year of assessment during which they are actually paid.

The types of expenses that would qualify for the AMTC include amounts paid for services rendered and medicines supplied by any duly registered medical practitioner, dentist, optometrist, homeopath, naturopath, osteopath, herbalist, physiotherapist, chiropractor or orthopaedist. Costs incurred for hospitalisation in a registered hospital or nursing home or home nursing by a registered nurse, midwife or nursing assistant will also qualify.

Any “over the counter” medicine will not qualify unless it is prescribed by any duly registered physician (as listed above) and acquired from a registered pharmacist. Medical expenses incurred and paid outside South Africa will qualify if it relates to services and medicines which are substantially similar to those listed above. Furthermore, the Commissioner may also prescribe qualifying expenses in respect of physical impairment or disability that could qualify for tax relief.

The AMTC amount is based on specific formulas and will depend on the taxpayer’s age (i.e. whether or not the taxpayer is 65 and older) and whether the taxpayer, his or her spouse or any of the taxpayer of his or her spouse’s children has a disability as defined.

[1] No. 58 of 1962

[2] Section 6A of the Income Tax Act

This article is a general information sheet and should not be used or relied upon as professional advice. No liability can be accepted for any errors or omissions nor for any loss or damage arising from reliance upon any information herein. Always contact your financial adviser for specific and detailed advice.  Errors and omissions excepted (E&OE)

INTEREST RECEIVED BY NON-RESIDENTS ON SA BANK ACCOUNTS

B4Persons that are not tax resident in South Africa (“SA”) are only taxed in SA on income received by or which accrued to such non-resident from an SA source. This will include interest received on an SA bank account.[1]

Non-residents may, however, be exempt from SA income tax on interest earned in terms of section 10(1)(h) of the Income Tax Act. The section 10(1)(h) exemption does not apply though to the extent that the non-resident is a natural person who was physically present in SA for a period exceeding 183 days in the 12-month period preceding the date on which the interest was received by or accrued. In these circumstances, the non-resident must register for income tax and declare such SA source interest to the South African Revenue Service. The exemption will also not apply where the debt from which the interest arises is effectively connected to a permanent establishment of that person in SA[2] or where the interest received is in the form of an annuity.[3] The general interest exemptions in section 10(1)(i) may, however, still apply to non-residents that are natural persons.

Other than for an income tax effect, non-residents earning SA source interest can also be subject to the withholding tax on interest (“WTI”) at a rate of 15%, unless certain exemptions apply.[4] This withholding rate can be reduced by an applicable double taxation agreement between SA and the foreign country where the person (who is a non-resident for SA tax purposes) is tax resident. Two exemptions from WTI may apply to non-residents receiving interest on an SA bank account. Firstly, there is a general exemption from interest received from SA banks.[5] Secondly, no WTI is payable where the non-resident exceeds the 183-day threshold as set out above.[6]

In summary, non-residents are not subject to WTI on interest received on an SA bank account. Also, no liability for income tax will arise on condition that none of the exclusions in section 10 mentioned above applies. To the extent that any of these exclusions apply though, the non-resident will have to register for income tax in SA and submit an income tax return. An applicable double taxation agreement should also be considered as it may contain specific provisions relating to the taxation of interest and providing relief to the extent that none is afforded by the domestic legislation discussed in this article, although this will not affect the obligation to submit an income tax return to the South African Revenue Service.

[1] Section 9(2)(b) of the Income Tax Act, 58 of 1962

[2] Section 10(1)(h)

[3] Section 10(2)(b) of the Income Tax Act

[4] Sections 50A to 50D of the Income Tax Act

[5] Section 50D(1)(a) of the Income Tax Act

[6] Section 50D(1)(c) of the Income Tax Act

This article is a general information sheet and should not be used or relied upon as professional advice. No liability can be accepted for any errors or omissions nor for any loss or damage arising from reliance upon any information herein. Always contact your financial adviser for specific and detailed advice.  Errors and omissions excepted (E&OE)

THE TAXATION OF EMPLOYEE INCENTIVE SCHEMES

B3It has become popular commercial practice for many employers to design employment incentive schemes whereby employees are remunerated for services rendered over a period of time by allowing them to participate in share incentive schemes. Typically, these schemes take the form of either cash-based settled schemes or share-based settled schemes. The former involves participating employees receiving a cash payment after a certain period at the exercise of their share appreciation rights equal to the increase in value of the underlying share value to which the scheme is linked. Share-based payments, on the other hand, involve the employees receiving actual shares in the employer company and which would (ideally) have increased in value over the period of time, due in part to the employees’ endeavours and involvement in the company’s activities.

In terms of section 8C of the Income Tax Act,[1] these benefits received by employees through participation in such schemes are taxed on income tax account, in other words, on the same basis as though these benefits had been a salary earned.

Depending on whether the rights granted under the scheme are restricted or not, the tax consequences arising for the employee will fall due either when the options are granted to the employees (in the case where no restrictions in relation to the options exist), or only once they are exercised or vest for purposes of section 8C (typically when the restrictions linked to the rights granted falls away).[2] At that stage, the gain to be taxed is calculated as being the value of the benefits received in terms of the scheme minus the amount paid (if any) to acquire those benefits.[3]

Restrictions for section 8C’s purposes typically take the form of a restriction on when the rights acquired may be exercised (typically linked to an employee remaining in service of the company for a number of years), or a prohibition on the employee transferring or selling those rights at market value to other persons (the rights granted are often not permitted to be sold to another).[4]

Take the following as an example: Company A grants an employee the right to receive shares in it worth R10 by paying an amount of R1 only. If that right to take up shares may be exercised immediately, and no restriction linked to transferability thereof for example exists, that “unrestricted equity instrument” will give rise to a taxable gain of R9 when the option is received. Where the right to subscribe for shares in Company A for R1 may however only be exercised if the employee is still in employment of Company A within 3 years’ time, or may be exercised at any point in time but may not be sold to another, then the gain realised for section 8C’s purposes will only be calculated when and at the value of the shares when these are eventually acquired. In such an instance, the gain calculated should be reduced by the subscription price of R1 paid for the shares. Similarly, if the reward does not involve the subscription of shares, but rather a payment to the employee of the increased value of shares over a predetermined period in time, the value of the shares minus the R1 paid to acquire the options will be the amount of the gain subject to income tax.

Section 8C has been the focus of many legislative amendments over the past few years and involves arguably one of the most complex provisions of the Income Tax Act. Employees and employers alike would therefore be well-advised to take detailed tax advice prior to entering into, and exercising, rights provided for in terms of employment incentive schemes such as these described above.

[1] 58 of 1962

[2] Section 8C(3)

[3] Section 8C(2)

[4] See the definition of “restricted equity instrument” in section 8C(7)

This article is a general information sheet and should not be used or relied upon as professional advice. No liability can be accepted for any errors or omissions nor for any loss or damage arising from reliance upon any information herein. Always contact your financial adviser for specific and detailed advice.  Errors and omissions excepted (E&OE)

SECURITIES TRANSFER TAX

B2Levied at 0.25% of the value of shares transferred,[1] the securities transfer tax (“STT”) is a tax often neglected and forgotten. Introduced in 2008, the tax is levied on the transfer of shares held in South African companies or the transfer of membership interests held South African close corporations. The issuing of a share is however not a “transfer” for purposes of the Securities Transfer Tax Act, nor the buying back / redemption / cancellation of a share by the company whose share it is itself where that company is in the process of having its existence terminated.[2]

Due to being a tax which is often overlooked, taxpayers often neglect the administrative requirements linked to the tax too, not only in terms of their relative payment obligations towards the fiscus and doing so timeously, but also due to their failure to observe the relevant filing obligations linked to the requisite tax payments.[3] Such administrative oversights may affect a future application by taxpayers for tax clearance certificates to be issued to them, and may also have a bearing on applications for the suspension of amounts of tax in dispute (STT or other) and ostensibly due to the Commissioner.[4]

STT is ultimately borne by the purchaser of the shares being transferred,[5] although a number of exemptions may apply.[6] Primary among these are transfers of shares to which the so-called “group relief” provisions in the Income Tax Act[7] apply,[8] as well as a transfer of shares in property rich companies on which transfer duty is levied.[9] Finally, in terms of the de minimis provision in section 8(1)(r), STT will also not apply to transfers of shares where the STT payable is less than R100. In other words, no STT is levied on a transfer of shares where the shares transferred have a value of less than R40,000.

It is important to note that STT is levied on the transfer of both listed and unlisted shares, and clients are therefore encouraged, in the interest of a clean tax administrative record, to take their STT obligations seriously.

[1] Section 2(1) of the Securities Transfer Tax Act, 25 of 2007

[2] See the definition of “transfer” in section 1 of the Securities Transfer Tax Act

[3] These requirements are contained in the Securities Transfer Tax Administration Act, 26 of 2007

[4] In terms of section 164(3)(b) of the Tax Administration Act, 28 of 2011, a taxpayers compliance history is to be considered where the Commissioner decides to suspend an amount of tax in dispute from being payable pending the outcome of that dispute.

[5] Section 7 of the Securities Transfer Tax Act

[6] Section 8

[7] 58 of 1962

[8] Section 8(1)(a)

[9] Section 8(1)(n)

This article is a general information sheet and should not be used or relied upon as professional advice. No liability can be accepted for any errors or omissions nor for any loss or damage arising from reliance upon any information herein. Always contact your financial adviser for specific and detailed advice.  Errors and omissions excepted (E&OE)